Has Fur Finally Had Its Day in China?

Companies like Prada, Michael Kors, and Gucci have all joined the international Fur Free Retailer scheme to date, now numbering over 1,500. Since 2012, ACTAsia, a non-profit working for sustainable social change in China, has been promoting fur-free fashion on the Mainland. The Jing Take: Although fur is popular in China (primarily as trims or […]

Companies like Prada, Michael Kors, and Gucci have all joined the international Fur Free Retailer scheme to date, now numbering over 1,500. Since 2012, ACTAsia, a non-profit working for sustainable social change in China, has been promoting fur-free fashion on the Mainland.

The Jing Take: Although fur is popular in China (primarily as trims or accessories), attitudes are changing. A recent ActAsia survey of 5,400 consumers across six cities expect fur-free to be the next trend, as 71 percent of customers said they would prefer fashion items from fur-free brands.

This latest signee follows the release of a report called Toxic Fur: a Global Issue. Its two years of research demonstrates that many fur products sold in China may contain potentially hazardous chemicals, which could adversely affect human health and the environment. This news is especially relevant for parents who may now choose to bring children up without fur. With Gen-Z consumers already rethinking the material, could this latest move mean that moms and pops too will be joining the fight against fur?

The Jing Take reports on a piece of the leading news and presents our editorial team’s analysis of the key implications for the luxury industry. In the recurring column, we analyze everything from product drops and mergers to heated debate sprouting on Chinese social media.